Nordisk manuskonkurranse!

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Nordisk manuskonkurranse!

Er du god til å skrive? Er du 18-25 år gammel? Drømmer du om å skrive et filmmanus? Northern Script gir deg muligheten tilå lære og konkurrere med andre som deg. Konkurransen er åpen for ikke-profesjonelle unge manusforfattere som bor i de Nordiske landene Finland, Sverige eller Norge. Finalistene blir valgt ut til å jobbe med profesjonelle veiledere. De 3 beste manusene vil blir premiert.

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NUFF 2017 - and the winner is...

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NUFF 2017 - and the winner is...

NUFF 2017 has 6 awards: the best international film, the best nordic film in age group <18, the best nordic film in age group 19-21, the best nordic film in age group 22-26, the best nordic film and the audience award. Every award is handmade glass statue manufactured by Glasshytta Blåst in Tromsø.

International Jury NUFF 2017

The award goes to a film that has a subject with a long history in fiction and fantasy. Whereas the film's writing and use of literary affectations presented through dialogue is reminiscent of Edgar Allen Poe, the careful compositions and detailed scenography - and even it's interesting use of focus and close ups - reminds us of the early work of Jeunet & Caro. The frame of the film is clean with harmonious colors, which makes it really enjoyable to watch. Together with a camera language that is clearly and accurately stated, the story is reasonably plotted, the logic is clear, and the speed is well controlled. This film is short, but with many layers, including suspense, thrill, moral principals, humanity and thoughts. 

The films use of symbolism and well thought through placement of objects in the scenes, immediately makes the audience think about cannibalism, a feeling that quickly grows stronger as the film progresses, enhanced by the camerawork and imagery. The feeling that the main character is trapped makes us impatient for the film to show us what comes next, to just bring us the inevitable resolution, but the film dares to hold on a while longer, before flipping the story around on us; the hunter is revealed to be the hunted one. The sum of all this makes for a film that easily can be watched more than once.

For great writing, great art direction and excellent cinematography, the jury is happy to give the award to

Jack Ethan Perry

for the film

A Girl Goes For Dinner (UK).


NORDIC JURY NUFF 2017

Best film in category 18 and younger:

This film tells a story accessible to anyone who questions whether growing up means we need to stop playing. The jury was impressed by the cinematic combination of genres and production techniques there were used to create a film that was a pleasure to watch .

Kid Inside (Legebarn)
by Lasse Hvidt Freiesleben Laursen (DK)

Special mention in category 19-21 :

This mention goes to a short, precise documentary essay, about a personal, intimate issue, dealing with gender and body. A film that won in Gothenburg and then was invited here to NUFF.

I Think about it in the Shower (I duschen tanker jag på det som mest)
by Robin Nicolina Gustafsson (SE)

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Best film in category 19-21 :

This film explores the longing, abandonment, and distress of the millions of children fleeing from war, some of whom are separated from their mothers and fathers by war. Connected only by a fragile online connection, the main character gives us insight into the intense contradictions and emotional turmoil facing a boy who must live with uncertainty and existential angst.

The jury was touched by the chance to empathies with kids whose stories remain largely untold. Shot confidently in long takes, the film featured good direction and convincing performances by the young lead actors.

The Conversation (Samtalen)
by Agnete Gradek (NO)

Special mention in category 22-26 :

This goes to a conceptual film, mixing music and images together in a daring and effective way, questioning political and commercial power. A film that also was the opening film of NUFF.

Skitzosatan – Lonely Wizard (Skizosatan – Ensom Trollmann)
by Andrea Conradsen (NO)

A timely film about the relationship between a young girl, her older sister, and her sister’s girlfiend.
Exceptionally convincing performances with carefully observed relationships between the characters, the film gives us a nuanced reflection of sexual orientation and growing up in increasingly diverse families. This is a Swedish/Norwegian production shot at Kvaløya just outside Tromsø.

My Gay Sister (Min homosyster)
by Lia Hietala ( SE/NO)


Best Nordic film

Awarded with 10000,- NOK by the Foreningen Norden, the Nordic Association that strongly supports Nordic collaboration, and work for a strong integration in the Nordic countries, based on the efforts of a lot of members around the countries. In Northern Norway, and here in Tromsø the understanding of common nordic issues is present, and we support NUFF with all our heart, and a Prize for the winner of the Nordic section.

The winning film is a mix of genres, and somehow it must have developed during the making of the film, just as the film develops for us as an audience. It has taken patience and conceptual focus, its personal, emotional, and manage to engage. It uses both animation and is a documentary.

Mum´s Hair (Mammas Hår)
by Maja Arnekleiv

NUFF 2017 audience award goes to

ASK NO QUESTIONS

by Hanna Suni & Iver Jensen from Norway

 

 

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VR/360 - interview with cristian dominguez

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VR/360 - interview with cristian dominguez

The future of filmmaking is coming to NUFF! We interviewed Cristian Dominguez, the VR guru from spain, who is also a workshop leader for the group VR/360. 

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About the workshop:

They are going to learn how to shoot 360 videos. Myself as a mentor will not be involved in the creative development of the video, so I am just going to be giving them tips on how to technically make it happen. I will teach them how to script on VR, some shooting techniques for different results and how to use VR to help them create this empathy or whatever they want to create.

Tell us a bit about your working history.

I mainly shoot commercials. It is not the best job in the world, but it is the one that is giving us money for development on our techniques and developing our own cameras.

About commercials, what the clients want is always to have the product very close to the camera, make it bright, make it pop up. They are not letting us do the whole storytelling-development, they are not letting us do the actual scripting on what is going on. For example, I shot this electronic music festival in Brazil called Tomorrowland, where there were many great story-telling potentials. People met from all over the world - it was a very international festival. There was a lot of possibilities, a lot of potential to develop a good storytelling video on that. But they only wanted someone dancing there, fist bumps with the DJ’s, selfies, beer and so on… I will say that on my side, on my career, on our company, we did not have the chance to explore the different storytelling options.

That is why I am now going to festivals, meeting creative people and giving them the tools so they can start doing it because the professional companies have to focus on making a little bit more money to be able to develop the techniques for years.
Still, we have done some jobs that included some storytelling. For example, the Fukushima documentary story in Japan, it is called Contaminated lives, it has a voice over, someone that gets you thru the video and it has some interviews with people that were affected by the nuclear disaster and the tsunami. It has an emotional drive in its story. And even though it was a commercial for Green Peace, it is still something that allows the storyteller to develop an idea from the start and to use something with conclusions and a real cinematic experience.

How did you discover the world of VR/360?

I was working with this company BBVA in Spain, and they had an innovative lab that I was the director of. So they just wanted to be the number one company of new technologies. We were playing with 3D-printing, interfacial intelligence and loads of other stuff. Then, 4 years ago I saw these camera rigs were about to come out, they were still in prototype and I thought “I can totally do this, myself!”, because I had all the tools for it. So I buildt the camera rigs with GoPros. The first video I shot was a commercial. It was a huge success! After doing that I buildt another camera rig, and I shot another commercial, and I earned more money on those two shootings than I was going to earn all year on working for BBVA. So I quit my job, took my cameras and flew to San Francisco and LA for three months. I stayed there developing my cameras, and expecting to find a VR company in the US. When I landed in Hollywood I was interviewed by people like Michael Bay, very high people in the directing world. Because they were really interested in this. I did some work for some movies, and I will say, that was not the moment for VR to come out. So I spent all my money and I was back to Spain, and I started shooting more VR videos for companies, I started earning more money, getting more jobs and I finally ended up finding some co-founders in Spain and we founded a company together. We have been working together for two years now. It came out as a success earlier in Spain than it did in USA, I do not know why, probably because it is a smaller country, and it was easier to sell the products. I am still expecting to go back to the states, and start a successful development of a company there. But it is more difficult now, with all the VISA things, and with Donald Trump. We can all go and make a big staff over there!

What do you think about Norway in the film and VR world?

I have been to Norway a couple times before, in Oslo, and in Tromsø. I was in Tromsø earlier this year presenting the Fukushima documentary at TIFF. I believe that Norway has a lot of possibilities for VR, because people here are not concerned about the same things as they are concerned about in the rest of the world. Like competitors, that is actually a good thing here, because there are less people here, so having more competitors to make the market grow faster and better. I think that there is a huge potential for a bigger VR market here in Norway.

Your thoughts about NUFF and TVIBIT?

First of all, I find it amazing that you guys in the city have an actual place like Tvibit for development. Also having the government involved in developing young people in the artistic world is amazing, and it is the right thing to do, and it is not happening anywhere else. I can tell you, I have been in 20 countries just this last year, it does not happen anywhere else! I also like the structure you have here in Tvibit. It is nonacademic, so everyone who is here is like an interpreter, someone who has the faith of developing their own products. Having the community help them get to that goal. This is the perfect place for their own self development. I wish I had the opportunity of having all this when I was launching my own products.

 Dear VR/360 participants;

Be prepared to work very hard, to learn a lot of new things and to not get enough sleep. I can say if that you think you can bring something cool to the table, but it looks too difficult to do it, or you do not know how to do it – I’m an expert on shooting 360 videos, so there is nothing we can’t do.

 

Author: Aminda Sæverud

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MY GAY SISTER - Interview With Lia Hietala

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MY GAY SISTER - Interview With Lia Hietala

Hi again!

With only one day left (!!!) until the festival and the workshops start, we are sooo exited to get started and to meet everyone. On that occasion, here is an interview of Lia Hietala. She is the creator of the movie "My gay sister" that will be shown at Tvibit the 25th of june at 19:00 o'clock. See you there! 

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Describe the movie with one word.

Hard but still easy: Love

How was the process?

The process has been good! It was a lot of jobb in the pre-production with managing to connect people from Sweden and Norway and getting them up to Tromsö for location scout and rehearsals. Also a bit under pressure when we got the notification about Berlinale for the post-production, but so many people have been working so hard to complete this film and I could not be more happy with the result. 

What was your favorite thing about the process?

My favorite thing was that I got to work with Karin Stenwall, the DOP. She is an amazing cinematographer and our working chemistry is so good. We're now working on getting funding for our next short film and I'm so excited to start the pre-production with her again. She is such a driven and hard working genius. 

What does this movie mean to you personally?

This film has both helped me acknowledging myself as a director. Today I know that people that I admire in the industry also wants to work with me, and not only the other way around. I would not have known that if I didn't have the guts to ask them to work with me on this film. That was a huge stepping stone for me. The second thing is the theme of the film, to bring light on the fact that kids think about emotions and feelings way earlier than most grown ups imagine. If I could have seen this film when I was ten, I think some part of my way of creating my identity could have been smoother. 

What should the audience be looking forward to about your movie?   

Omg, the acting! It's incredible! All the actresses in the film is outstanding. Of course the main actress, who was ten years old while shooting the film, she is so present, but it could not have been possible without the support from the others in the cast. 

What is Your favorite quote from the movie?

It must be when Cleo says that she could be in love with Kevin, then she changes her mind and tells the truth because he doesn't exist: "So it has to be Sadira." 

It tells the idea of our heterosexual society that everyone tries to fit in to and then she breaks free because she feel safe and comfortable enough to speak her real emotions. Also she says it in the most simple way. 

Say something about the message of the movie.

The film is about acknowledging that all children are not heterosexual and it's important to think about how we talk to and about children when we assume their sexuality. 

 

Author: Aminda Sæverud

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LOLA - Interview With Roberth Fuentes

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LOLA - Interview With Roberth Fuentes

Hello! Hope you have had a great weekend! We are celebrating monday, and only 4(!!!) days left 'til the festival with a interview with Roberth Fuentes, who made the film Lola. It will be screened at Verdensteateret saturday at 7PM during the festvial!
Hope to see you there! 

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Do you have something you want to say to the audience that are going to see this movie?
I want someone to know that anything is possible and that we can inspire each other. If you have faith in yourself and trust in something greater than yourself, then you can achieve anything.

Describe the movie with one word.
FAITH

 

How was the process?
The process was a huge challenge for me also because I was trying to capture my grandmother who raised me. My grandmother is blind and I have lived with her from a young age.
Through the process I came to realise and feel how her world is confined in the walls of her house. The space that is familiar to her is inside her home and this is her world. She rarely goes outside of this. It made me understand her better. How it must be for her.

What was your favorite thing about the process?
The best thing about the process is that I got to know my grandmother even better. I got to know her as a person and who she really is.

What does this movie mean to you personally?
This movie is very important to me. My grandmother raised me since I was a child until now. She has always been there for me. She sacrificed everything for me and I could never pay her back for this. That is why I made this movie, not just for myself but for her children and grandchildren so that they understand and never forget the sacrifice their mother and grandmother has made for them.

What should the audience be looking forward to about your movie?  
To understand someone else’s life for a moment.

Say something about the message of the movie.
It is a reminder that no matter how bad the situation is, there is always hope.

 

Author: Aminda Sæverud

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HYGGE - Interview With Rachel Mcgill

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HYGGE - Interview With Rachel Mcgill

Hey! How you doing? We are doing amazing, because we have another interview for you! This time it is with Rachel Mcgill, the maker of Hygge. The film will be shown sunday at 3.30 PM during the festival.
Here is her answers to our questions;

 

Do you have something you want to say to the audience that are going to see this movie? 

- The basic message of this film is that people aren't born racist, racism is something that is learned and the innocence of a child can be ruined by outer influences.

Describe the movie with one word.

-Heartwarming.

 

How was the process?

- I began making this film as part of a project with RTÉ and the Fresh film festival where they picked 12 young filmmakers. We were all given one month of the year and had to make a short with only that in mind. I got December so the first thing I thought of was christmas, Christmas was a huge part of my life growing up, growing up with a lot of brothers and sisters made it even more special. I got thinking about how special a time it was for me and my family, regardless of religion it was a time of togetherness and good will within my community. In addition to thinking of christmas, I was hearing a lot about the Syrian refugees in Ireland, the way they were being treated and the fear surrounding them created by the media, It made me sad and angry. Thats how the idea was created, I want to show the innocence of childhood and how racism can come from all around us, once fear is taken away, innocence is left and there is a lot of acceptance in innocence.

 Once I had the script written I got together with my classmates and we started working on a Go Fund Me, we raised 500 euro and got the film made. There was a huge amount of pre production and myself and my producers spent hours everyday, sending and receiving emails, organising dates and equipment etc. I had an amazing crew, all of which were very invested in the project and gave it their all, even though for some, it was their first time on a proper set they worked like professionals, efficiently and without complaints. 

What was your favorite thing about the process?

-My favourite part of this project was the collaboration, it was a very collaborative project, from working the the Fresh Film Festival to working with my classmates, I heavily relied on people and they really pulled through for me and for the film.

What does this movie mean to you personally

-To me, this film is about acceptance, both of these kids are coming from families with problems, there is sadness and worries but there is also love, in both families. I really wanted to show that both children were going through very similar things, their days were very similar and so was their lives. Despite the racial and cultural differences, they both come together to be best friends, they love each other regardless of what is going on around them.

What should the audience be looking forward to about your movie?

The audience can look forward to a very sweet, heartwarming film. Expect tears and a big smile on your face.

Say something about the message of the movie.

The message of this film is very important, I expect the film will speak for itself and I hope the audience will take what they need from it. Despite our racial and cultural differences, we are all born the same.

 

Author: Aminda Sæverud

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THE WEDNERAL - Interview with Hugo Anderson

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THE WEDNERAL - Interview with Hugo Anderson

We meet again! Let me present to you; THE WEDNERAL!
The Wedneral is a up-beat, funny and absurd film. It is made by Hugo Anderson, who is next in line for our interview. The film is shown on sunday at 2 PM.
Enjoy!

 

Do you have something you want to say to the audience that are going to see this movie?

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Not really!

Describe the movie with one word.

Strange.

How was the process? 

Fun and painful.

What was your favorite thing about the process?

The days we were filming, it was a lot of fun :)

What does this movie mean to you personally?

I learned a lot and therefore it means a lot for me.

What should the audience be looking forward to about your movie?  

Leif "cool corpse" olsson!

What is Your favorite quote from the movie? 

Tig för fan kärringjävel! (Silent your old hag!)

I honestly have so many questions although I understood everything. It is such a fun movie! Do you have an expected reaction from the audience?

I´m happy that you find our film funny! I hope the audience will as well, but I think some might find it a bit to wierd, it´s not for everyone :)

 

Author: Aminda Sæverud

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ASK NO QUESTIONS - Interview With Hanna Suni

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ASK NO QUESTIONS - Interview With Hanna Suni

Hello, beautiful people! This week we are publishing the first of several interviews of young filmmakers from all around the world, who are screening their films at NUFF. First out is Hanna Suni, from Lofoten, Northern Norway. She is the director behind the movie Ask No Questions, with Co-driector Iver Jensen. The film is shown on saturday at 7 PM.
Enjoy!

 

If you have something you want to add in addition to these Q’s and A’s, just feel free to include it!

Oh, the irony… a Q&A about a film called “Ask no questions”. Well, it´s not the first time.

Do you have something you want to say to the audience that are going to see this movie?

“Ask no questions” is a powerful, one-take film where you are following our main character, 11-year-old Anders, who is about to make the toughest decision of his life. It will be terrifying and painful, but of course there is a happy ending. Or is it?

Describe the movie with one word.

Intense.

How was the process?

The movie was actually filmed in just two days; one day of rehearsals and then one day of shooting. In a film like this, there is so much that could go wrong, all the time. And if it does, you have to start all over again. We had to wait for the perfect light so that the exposure would be the same inside as outside, we only had limited of ammunition for the gun as well as t-shirts for the father, if we panned a little too much to left or right we might see a person or a light that we were not supposed to show in frame, WE HAD KIDS IN THE BIG PARTS. Briefly summarized: it was freaking scary.

What was your favorite thing about the process?

I think the pressure about having such a limited time and recourses, made it even more fun to actually succeed with the making of this film. We didn’t know for sure if we would be able to do it the way we had planned, even hours before the shoot, but we had the best mini-crew ever and they made us believe that it was possible. They were super patient and positive the whole way (even when we freaked out). We couldn’t have done it without them.

What does this movie mean to you personally?

You will come to realize that this in many ways is a very sad movie, when you get over the scares and are able to get your high pulse down. It´s about an extreme case of domestic violence, where there are kids involved. Kids do seldom have the strength to come forward by them self, so who is to tell when these sorts of things are happening in homes behind closed doors? I hope this film will give those who need it a voice.

What should the audience be looking forward to about your movie? 

The whole experience. It´s a very visual film, but the sound and the music is also really great. They fit perfectly together and is amplifying the feelings that you already will be having when watching it.

How was it working with such young children? 

I have actually worked with kids on almost every film that I ever made, so I kind of knew what I signed up for. But still, it´s always a bit scary because of the unpredictability that may occur. In this film that was not a problem at all. The kids did such a great job, was focused the whole time and took directions really well. They always tell you “never work with animals or children”, but I have never had an experience with either of them that couldn’t be handled. I think dealing with a real diva sometime in the future will be way more problematic…

I personally got quite scared while watching it, do you have an expected reaction from the audience?

There is always someone in the audience yelling or screaming at some point in the film. The best screening, we´ve had this far, was in Seattle at a youth film festival. People were sitting on the edge of their seats, ready to get up and run away. It was amazing to sit amongst the audience with none of them knowing that I was the maker of that film. Then afterwards you could hear them start whispering, discussing it. Because you will probably be left with a lot of questions twirling around in your head after watching this film. Questions you maybe think I have the answer to, so after watching it, you´re welcome to come ask me. I will not guarantee anything.

 

Author: Aminda Sæverud

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NUFF 2017 program release

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NUFF 2017 program release

Finally we like to present the NUFF 2017 film program. 50 shorts from all over the world participating in two competition over 5 prizes. Two competent juries will work hard on the decisions. As NUFF-Special we will present the world of VR/360 live at the Verdensteatret cinema.

Check the film program here...

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NUFF Staff 2017

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NUFF Staff 2017

With only a month until NUFF 2017 kicks off, we decided it is time to show off our amazing staff this year! 

 

HANSINE SÆVERUD

Hansine is the name, transport coordinator is the game. 19 years of age.
This will be my second year attending NUFF. Last year I was a volunteer in the café, and met so many amazing, creative people! I am looking forward to being the transport coordinator this year, and to drag around on the awesome participants.
Yeah, I am Aminda’s sister… Big sister, actually.

 

 

 

 

JOHANNE SOFIE DALVIK

My name is Johanne, I'm 21 years old.
This is the fifth year I am a part of NUFF. I've been a part of NUFF as a workshop participant and as a staff member, and I have always had a great time at NUFF. This year I'm looking forward to being the producer at Verdensteatret, where the NUFF films will be screened.
I'm super excited for NUFF this year,I just love the fun and creative atmosphere at Tvibit during NUFF!

 

 

 

ISAK ANDREASSEN

My name is Isak William Andreassen, and I am 18 years old. This will be my fourth year at NUFF. I am the voulenteer coordinator and I, together with Jenny, are responsible for getting the voulenteers, organizing their rosters and making sure that they thrive. NUFF is one of my highlights in the summer and I hope to see many new faces this year.
 

 

 

JENNY K. HANSEN

My name is Jenny Kristine Hansen, and I'm 17 years old. This is my first year as a staffmember at NUFF, and I am the volunteer coordinator together with Isak. I look foward to working with the staff, and you! Sign up as a volunteer now on mail to one of us, whihu juhu it's fun!

 

 

 

 

GAUTE JOHANSEN

My name is Gaute And Im 20 years old. This is my first year as a staff member, but i have been part of NUFF as a actor before. Im looking forward to hear from you since my role is guestcoordinator and I'll try to answer any questions you might have.

 

 

 

 

 

 

AMINDA SÆVERUD

Greetings loved ones! I am Aminda Sæverud, and I’m 17 years old.
I attended NUFF last year as a PR-coordinator, and I am continuing with that this year. In addition to that, I will also function as Sigurds’ slave as the festival-coordinator. I had such a blast last year, and I can't wait for NUFF 2017 to start!
Hansine might be my bigger sister, but I am more mature AND have more responsibility.

 

 

 

 

CARLA BRAASTAD GRAPE

Hello! My name is Carla Grape, I have never worked at NUFF before, but I do have a terrific impression of the festival. I really look forward to working with so many talented people, and especially in the workshops since I am the workshop-coordinator. I am also working as a PR-coordinator with wonderful Aminda!

 

 

 

 

 

Authors: Aminda Sæverud & Carla Grape

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Extending deadline for NUFF-workshops

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Extending deadline for NUFF-workshops

"NUFF is THE most well organized film workshop I have ever been a part of. It's no miracle that everyone has been able to produce such great films in the time we have had; it's all due to great organizing, planning and recourses here at NUFF. I love every part of the experience." (Participant 2016)

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The workshop leaders for NUFF 2017

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The workshop leaders for NUFF 2017

The mentors for the NUFF film workshops are ready to go. Four professional filmmakers with different approaches and experience will be at NUFF 2017 to coach, mentor and have fun with the young filmmakers coming from all over the world to NUFF. Check out who is coming here... and submit for participation here...

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Workshops at NUFF 2017

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Workshops at NUFF 2017

This year NUFF is offering 3 different kind of workshops. You can participate at the film-workshops, VR/360 film workshop and Special effects/green-screen workshop. For more info just check here...

 

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Call for entry

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Call for entry

Now you can submit your films to three different film competitions at NUFF 2017! The entry-forms will be open until March 1st!

The Nordic film Competition

Films made by young filmmakers (26 and younger) who live or work in the Nordic countries (Greenland, Iceland, Faroe Islands, Denmark, Sweden, Norway & Finland). The films must be not longer then 20 minutes and produced after January 2015. The competition has four awards: best film in each age group (<18, 19-21, 22-26) and the best Nordic film (all ages).

The International film competition

For films produced outside the Nordic countries, which are not longer then 20 minutes, produced in the last two years and the filmmakers are 26 years old and younger. The competition has one award: the best international film at NUFF 2017.

VR/360 film competition

For VR/360 degrees produced films from all over the world, which er not longer then 10 minutes and produces after June 1st 2015. The filmmakers are 26 old and Younger.

Find the entry forms here...

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NUFF 2016 - The Winners

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NUFF 2016 - The Winners

NUFF 2016 had 301 film entries. At the end there was a film program with 45 films in 2 competition programs, a special program with 1 professional film (Ambulance), 1 extra short film program on the topic of refugees in Europe, 1 opening film, 1 closing film, and the screening of 6 workshop films. Altogether, there was shown 52 films in 11 programs with 445 spectators during this year's festival. Screening location was the Verdensteatret Kino in Tromsø.

Nordic Youth Film Competition

The Nordic competition was announced in January during Tromsø International Film Festival (TIFF) and aimed at young filmmakers under 26 from all the Nordic countries, which made a film during the last 2 years. The film should not last longer than 20 minutes. The announcement was promoted through NUFF's e-mail lists, Facebook, Twitter, websites, Tvibit, Film Port, various online film festival sites and the media.

124 films were submitted. All were seen by the selection jury which consisted of Marte B. Aasen and Hermann Greuel.
26 films were nominated for the screenings. 2 of them were already nominated as the NUFF-award winners at Novemberfestivalen in Trollhättan, Sweden. The 24 other films came from Norway, Finland, Faroe Islands, Denmark and Sweden.

The films were divided into three age groups: <18 (4 films), 19-21 (5 films) and 22-26 (17 films).

The jury for the Nordic Youth Film Competition was Arne Sommer (Germany) leader of the film workshop Kiel and head of the Filmförderung Schleswig-Holstein, Sarah Schipschack Norway / Germany), artist and experimental filmskaper and Dane Dodds (South Africa), an artist, designer and filmmaker. The jury got the films before the festival, and took the decision at a jury meeting under NUFF.

The main award - The Best Nordic youth - was worth with 10 000,- donated by Foreningen Norden. Other prizes were given for the best film in its age group.

Best nordic film in age group under 18

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White Lies

by Tiril Celine Leggett, Norway 

Jury substantiation: “This short one-take film shines a light on a commonly practiced social paradigm, lying. The coping mechanism we so easily resort to. We applaud this film as it was able to achieve such a climax so quickly and not feel rushed. That is the truth.”

 

Best nordic film in age group 19 - 21

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Driving To Thule

by Tommy Flavin & Hanna Sunni, Faroe Islands, Irland, Norway

Jury substantiation: “Driving is not always about where you are going. This slow paced film captures a unique, yet somehow relatable thought pattern and allows space for the mind to wonder and adapt the film to mean something to each one watching it.”

 

Best nordic film in age group 22 - 26

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The One Who Remember More 

by Lauri Autere & Minna Valjanen, Finland

Jury substantiation: “’The one who remember more’ shows both the extreme beauty and brutality of the human existence. We see a wild and beautiful landscape with an brutal change for the land and the people. The narrator is an excellent storyteller who shares his history of the changing land for an industrial progress. The film is highly memorable and addresses important issues of life in our century.”

 

Best nordic film 2016 (main prize)

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Bestevenner / Best Friends

by Alexander Armas Kereklidis Turpin, Norway

Jury substantiation: “One girl, one boy, one question: friends or lovers? ”Bestevenner” goes a long way with this simple set-up. Love to detail, superb acting, clever writing, breath taking photography and a bucket full ideas build this into something great and complex out of that simple proposal. Watch it – on the big screen!”

 

 Best Nordic film <special mention>

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 Det kommer båter / There Will Be Boats

by Emilie K Beck, Norway

Jury substantiation: “Beautiful young people in a Mediterranean paradise. Cleaning up the hellish remains of war and world politics. ”Det kommer båter” leaves the comfort zone and goes to where Europe is hurting, where people are dying. It is hard to forget some of these scenes, and that is that how it should be. We need this!" 

 

International Youth Film Competition

The international competition was announced in January at TIFF and aimed at young filmmakers from all countries except the Nordic countries, which were under 26 years old and made their film during the last 2 years. The film should have a maximum length of 20 minutes. The announcement was promoted through NUFF's e-mail lists, Facebook, Twitter and the NUFF website, Tvibit and Filmport.no, Youth Cinema Network and various International Film Festival portals festivalfocus.org, click.com etc.

177 films were submitted from 45 different countries from all continents. Marte B Aasen and Hermann Greuel so all films and nominated 19 films.

The final nominated films came from 16 countries: Germany, Egypt, Belarus, Syria, Mexico, India, Palestine, Latvia, Switzerland, Iran, Iraq, USA, Portugal, UK, Indonesia and Israel.

The films were shown together with the Nordic films in seven sections on Verdensteatret Cinema.

This year's international jury were: Ismet Bachtiar (Norway) filmmaker and game developer, Dan Thomas (Wales) film distributer and Isra Odeh (Palestine) filmmaker.

The jury got the films before the festival, and took the decision at a jury meeting under NUFF. They selected one award for the best international youth film 2016 and one special mention.

Best international film NUFF 2016

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Alpajeevi / Short - Lived

by Naomi Shah, India

Jury substantiation: “Short-Lived has all the hallmarks of a great documentary film - uncovering a hidden story that would have otherwise been lost and combining its narrative with beautiful imagery and well-paced observations. Moreover, there is sense of deep empathy between the filmmaker and the subjects of the film, resulting in a story that is insightful and fascinating for audiences to watch. The filmmaker also embodies the spirit of what it is to be a young filmmaker - indomitable in overcoming the odds in pursuit of a good story and building an expectation for more good things to come from her craft.”

 

Best international film at NUFF 2016 <special mention>

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In the Parking Lot

by Juliana Orea, Mexico

 

The audience award

After many years abstinence NUFF had this year left a public price.  

The winner of the audience award was

In the Parking Lot

 by Juliana Orea, Mexico

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NUFF awards Novemberfestivalen 2016

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NUFF awards Novemberfestivalen 2016

As every year was nominated two new Swedish films from the annual Novemberfestivalen in Trollhättan, Sweden.

The winners are 

I DUSCHEN TÄNKER JAG PÅ DET SOM MEST by Robin Nicolina Gustafsson

An important story which presents reality in a very touching way.

WOLFIE’S TWO MAGIC WORDS by Mikael Ohlson

The film expresses in an intelligent and visual way how important it is to follow your dreams and that the way requests persistence and stand at will. 

This year NUFF festival coordinator Sigurd Kornelius Lakseide presented the awards at Novemberfestivalen.

The films are nominated to the Nordic competition at NUFF 2017!

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